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How to deal with a negative coworker?

How to deal with a negative coworker?

Some people exude negativity. They don’t like their jobs or they don’t like their company. Their bosses are always jerks and they are always treated unfairly. The company is always going down the tube and customers are worthless. You know these negative Neds and Nellies – every organization has some – and you can best address their impact on you via avoidance. On the other hand, sometimes normally positive people are negative. Some of the time, too, their reasons for negativity are legitimate. You will take a completely different tack with these occasionally negative people. We’ll deal with both of these varieties of negativity from people. Tips for Dealing With Occasional Negativity Listen to the employee or coworker’s complaints until you are certain that they feel heard out and listened to. Sometimes people repeat negative sentiments over and over because they don’t feel like you have really listened to them. Ask questions. Clarify their statements. Make sure you have actively listened. Decide if you believe the employee or coworker has legitimate reasons for their negativity. If you decide affirmatively, ask if they’d like your help to solve the problem. If they ask for help, provide advice or ideas for how the coworker can address the reason for their negativity. Short term advice that points a person in a positive direction is welcome. But, your role is not to provide therapy or counseling. Nor, is your role to provide comprehensive career advice or long term recommendations. Point the coworker to helpful books, seminars, or the Human Resources Department to solve their problem. Know your limits when advising coworkers. Sometimes, the coworker just wants to complain to a friendly, listening ear; they don’t want your advice or assistance to address the situation. Listen, but set limits so the coworker does not overstay or over-talk his or her welcome. Long term complaining saps your energy and positive outlook. Don’t allow that to happen. Walk away. Tell the coworker you’d prefer to move on to more positive subjects. If you listen to the coworker’s negativity, and decide the concerns are not legitimate, practice personal courage and tell them what you think. Tell the coworker you care about their...

Five mind-blowing lessons – TED talks

Five mind-blowing lessons – TED talks

What does it take to be happy? How do you motivate the people who work for you to do their best? How do you know what is and isn’t real in the world around you? You may think you know the answers to all these questions, but watching the 20 most popular TED talks of all time will likely change your mind. With speakers like Bill Gates and Sting to choose from, some of the highest standards anywhere, and a proven method for mining the best and most insightful information any speaker can share, by the time a talk is published on the TED website, it’s always worth watching and almost always brilliant. Just how great does a talk have to be to shine in that high-level group? Take a look at these examples and you’ll know. They are not only entertaining and thought provoking, but will likely make you rethink many of your assumptions. Here are just a few beliefs that these talks may unsettle: 1. Getting what we want will make us happy. Not by a long shot. After explaining how making his younger sister think she was a unicorn kept her from feeling pain after a fall, psychologist Shawn Achor explains how the external facts of our lives account for very little of our actual happiness. And Harvard psychologist Dan Gilbert shows us how we can be happy even when everything goes wrong. 2. The best leaders create great incentives. You might think that figuring out how to give employees the rewards and accomplishments they’re looking for would be the best way to create an effective organization. In fact, leadership expert Simon Sinek and the legendary Tony Robbins each explain in different ways that answering the question “Why?” is infinitely more powerful. 3. Some people are more creative than others. And you need those people on your team, right? It turns out that employees’ creativity has everything to do with how you motivate them–and the traditional forms of motivation are dead wrong, according to career analyst Dan Pink. Not only that, Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert makes the case that, rather than a few people “being” geniuses, all of us...

Do you really understand how your business customers buy?

Do you really understand how your business customers buy?

B2B purchasing decisions increasingly trace complex journeys, challenging the long-standing practices of many sales organizations. The CEO of a major supplier to the telecom industry was frustrated. An initiative to increase sales volumes and shift the company’s product mix to higher-value components was stalling, and not for lack of effort. With support from a marketing campaign that emphasized a slew of new product features, frontline sales managers had stepped up calls to their purchasing contacts at OEM customers. Yet they reported that buyers weren’t buying. Impediments appeared to include tough new requirements from chief purchasing officers, negative chatter on social media about postsales support, and skeptical questions on a product-rating site about an offering’s fully loaded costs. Welcome to the new dynamics of B2B sales. Decision-making authority for purchases is slipping away from individuals in familiar roles—often those with whom B2B sales teams have long-standing relationships. Just as the digital revolution has transformed once-predictable consumer purchasing paths into a more circular pattern of touch points, so too business-to-business selling has become less linear as customers research, evaluate, select, and share experiences about products. More people within (and, thanks to digital engagement, even outside) the organization are playing pivotal roles in sizing up offerings, so the path to closing sales has become more complicated. The best response is to embrace the new environment. Sellers who are ready to meet customers at different points on their journeys will exploit digital tools more fully, allocate sales and marketing resources more successfully, and stimulate collaboration between these two functions, thereby helping to win over reluctant buyers. Our experience with upward of 100 B2B sales organizations suggests that while the change required is significant, so are the benefits: an up to 20 percent increase in customer leads, 10 percent growth in first-time customers, and a speedup of as much as 20 percent in the time that elapses between qualifying a lead and closing a deal. The consumerization of business buying Marketers have long drawn a bright line between consumer shoppers and business purchasers. Consumers, after all, care deeply about brands and are more readily influenced by advertising, media messages, special deals, and coupons. In addition, they often turn to...

Malo o našim partnerima – Volvo Trucks

Malo o našim partnerima – Volvo Trucks

Record-holding highliner Faith Dickey battles to cross the line between two speeding trucks. Will she make it? Please like, share and comment! Explore the top 10 stories http://volvotrucks.com/fh The stunt was set up to show the precise handling of the new Volvo FH. Filmed on an unopened highway in Croatia in cooperation with Hollywood stunt director Peter Pedrero (James Bond, Harry Potter, Pirates of the Caribbean.) Directed by Academy Award nominee Henry Alex Rubin. Music by J. Ralph / The Rumor Mill. First day on the job and he thought he was there to park sports cars, but director Henry-Alex Rubin had other ideas for San Remo Casino’s newest valet. Share & go behind the scenes: http://youtu.be/xEBEElxJzp8 In Volvo Truck’s latest film, Academy Award nominated director Henry-Alex Rubin captures the priceless reaction of a new casino valet via hidden cameras. Unaware of what’s in store for his trial shift at the San Remo Casino on the Italian Riviera, our valet has actually been handpicked and set-up to showcase the sports car like driveability of the new I-Shift Dual Clutch gearbox. The president of Volvo Trucks puts his neck on the line in his own exciting stunt. No trick filming. Just Claes Nilsson, testing the new Volvo FMX. Would you dare? A red truck being chased by a herd of bulls through the streets of a Spanish city. The ultimate manoeuvrability test? This live test from Volvo Trucks shows how the new Volvo FL performs on tiny twisting streets in Ciudad Rodrigo, Spain. Oscar nominated director, Henry Alex Rubin, used 28 cameras in total to capture the event from every conceivable angle. Together with 50 runners, there was a crew of 250 people on site and hundreds of local spectators. Roland Svensson’s head measures 275 mm. The new Volvo FMX has 300 mm of ground clearance. See what a few centimetres more space can do. Watch Jean-Claude Van Damme carry out his famous split between two reversing trucks. Never done before, JCVD says it’s the most epic of splits — what do you think? This live test was set up to demonstrate the precision and directional stability of Volvo Dynamic Steering — a world first...

Seven steps to generating effective ideas using brainstorming

Seven steps to generating effective ideas using brainstorming

Brainstorming is a technique where ideas for a specific problem or situation are brought up freely, with the idea that nothing should be rejected until all of the ideas are presented. While normally brainstorming is done in groups, an individual can certainly hold a brain storm session on their own, by writing down their own ideas. Alex Osborn, an advertising executive who died in 1966, is credited for creating the process and giving it the moniker, “Brainstorming.” Osborn felt that the standard business meeting inhibited the creation and sharing of new ideas. As such he wanted to come up with a new method to develop ideas. He created the following rules for brainstorming: All ideas are welcome, no criticism. More ideas are better — you’re looking for quantity. As ideas are shared, people will build on each other. Wild, crazy and impossible ideas are encouraged. How does brainstorming in a meeting function? There are many different ways to conduct a brainstorming session, but here are seven general principles that will make brainstorming sessions and other meetings successful. Prepare for the session. You need a conference room with a place for notes to be taken. You can use flip charts, a white board, a computer that you can project onto a screen or whatever works for your group. Make sure you have the right materials, such as pens with enough ink. Assign a person to write on the board. The key talent consideration for this is handwriting, not level. It’s okay for an admin to take the notes, but the VP can also take on the note taker role. Gather your group together. The interactions among participants is a critical part of brainstorming. It is possible to do so over video conference, but if possible, having everyone in the same room can help. If you expect the meeting to last a long time, snacks and drinks never hurt. State the problem clearly. The purpose of brainstorming is to solve a specific problem. A good method is to write the problem clearly at the top of the board. For instance: “Location for company picnic” or “How to ensure employees always clock in and out” or “Ideas...

Missing the point on motivation

Missing the point on motivation

When it comes to improving employee engagement, motivation expert Susan Fowler believes that leaders are spending too much time trying to fix disengagement after it occurs instead of questioning approaches to motivation that may have led to it in the first place. In working with leaders, Fowler stresses not to wait until people have become disengaged before taking action. Instead, begin at the source of people’s engagement journey: their personal appraisal of their work environment. Recognize that on a daily basis, people are appraising their workplace and coming to conclusions on whether they feel safe, positive, and optimistic about the environment, or threatened, unsure, or fearful. These appraisals lead to conclusions about well-being, intentions, and subsequent behavior. “A leader’s role is to help people manage their appraisal process now so that people get on the path to employee work passion rather than the road to disengagement,” explains Fowler. “Every day is an opportunity for leaders to help individuals shift their motivational outlooks. Day-to-day motivation holds the key to long-term engagement.” According to Fowler, a primary reason engagement initiatives haven’t been as successful as hoped is that leaders do not understand the role motivation plays in the engagement process. That, and the outdated beliefs leaders have about motivation. “For many leaders, motivation techniques are pinned to entrenched, deeply rooted beliefs and values that haven’t been actively explored,” explains Fowler. “For example, what if I told you the latest research shows that a focus on results doesn’t necessarily yield the best results? “I think many leaders are afraid of changing traditional methods of motivation because they are worried about how people might react. However, our experience has been that when leaders are exposed to proven best practices and develop skills to use them, they are more inclined to move outside their comfort zone and try an alternative approach.” Looking Beyond Work And while Fowler is currently focused on improving the way leaders go about shaping a motivating workplace, she believes these same ideas need to be used in all areas of our lives. As she explains, “We have become expectant of receiving praise, rewards, or prizes if we do well—for example, if I graduate from high school...